David Foster Wallace’s “Consider the Lobster” | Writ …

What exactly does Foster Wallace want us to consider? Did he reveal in the essay something that made you think differently? What’s the point of his footnotes being so long? At the center of his argument is this question: “Is it all right to boil a sentient creature alive just for our gustatory pleasure?What conclusion do you think he ultimately comes to?

Consider the Lobster’ – David Foster ..

Sources CitedDavid Foster Wallace’s essay, “Consider the Lobster,” in Gourmet Magazine.

David Foster Wallace; Consider the Lobster;

It could be, in fact, but for now we will focus on how this depiction of events compares to David Foster Wallace’s essay, “Consider the Lobster,” which starts as a review of the Maine Lobster Festival, but soon morphs into an indictment of not only the conventions of lobster preparation, but also the entire idea of having an animal killed for one’s own consumption.

David Foster Wallace's 'Consider the Lobster' | Serious Eats

You know that’s going to be work.David Foster Wallace wrote three novels, three story collections, two collections of essays, and other things too, but his reputation still rests mainly on “Infinite Jest” — the 1,100-page novel published in 1996 and set alternately in a tennis academy and a rehab center — and on his sui generis now-nearly-a-genre long-form journalism about topics ranging from lobsters to dictionaries to John McCain to the Adult Video News awards for pornographic films.

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Wallace Animal Rights - David Foster Wallace’s essay Consider the Lobster

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Little Brown s The David Foster Wallace Reader is for my money a total Gift an appropriate word considering that Wallace believed that all True Art Reluctant Habits

Consider the Lobster: And Other Essays - Kindle edition by David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace - Wikipedia

In the article “Consider the Lobster” by Foster Wallace, the author encourages us to take a closer look at the carnivorous actions that we go through everyday without a second thought. By diving deep into this ethics discussion using the vehicle of one particular animal, in this case lobsters, he urges the reader to take account of things they may have not taken account of before, such as the morals and ethics (or lack of, depending upon the reader’s interpretation) that go into the consumption of animals for food. Personally, I thought it was interesting how he identified the fact that humans have no problem calling “lesser” animals, and the proteins that come from them by the same name, while with larger animals choosing to differentiate between the meat that can be eaten from it, and the live animal itself. This spurred my mind to think about the human psyche, and how with conditioning we can deceive ourselves so very easily, and disassociate from ourselves any unpleasant information (such as the fact that veal is actually made from a cute, sweet, baby cow).
The point of the footnotes was to provide the information that he had while writing the article. It allows the reader to go on the same journey that he did, which may lead them to the same conclusion about eating meat, or to at least give them the opportunity to make an informed decision, rather than just going along with what they are used to, or to what their pallet likes. I believe that David Wallace does not truly answer his own question. He presents the readers with much information, but in the end, ultimately lets them draw their own conclusions, while gently leading the audience in the direction of vegetarianism. His article seemed to be made to spur others to think, not just about themselves or other humans, but of the effect that their tastes have on the world around them, and to tune us in to the potential suffering of the small and large creatures that we use for food.

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It could be, in fact, but for now we will focus on how this depiction of events compares to David Foster Wallace’s essay, “Consider the Lobster,” which starts as a review of the Maine Lobster Festival, but soon morphs into an indictment of not only the conventions of lobster preparation, but also the entire idea of having an animal killed for one’s own consumption....